Eagle eye observatory

Canyon of the Eagles is proud to present Eagle Eye Observatory to our guests and visitors.  Our dark-sky location is considered one of the best astronomic viewing sites in Texas.  The elevation of the Eagle Eye Observatory is approximately 1,100 feet or 335 meters above sea level.

The observatory is a sliding-roof design with two independently movable roof sections.  Each roof section may be moved to create a variable size, side-viewing slit, or both sections may be moved to open the entire structure to the sky.

Eagle Eye Observatory provides modern telescopes with computer enhanced imaging and astronomical instruments.  Telescopes include:

  • 14” clear aperture Celestron 1400HD f/11 reflector with Edge Technology, fully automated on an equatorial mount with Go-To targeting;
  • 12” aperture Meade Schmidt Cassegrain f/10 Reflector on an Alt/Az fork mount with Go-To Technology;
  • 11” Celestron Schmidt Cassegrain f/10 converted to f/2 via HyperStar lens with Mallincam Xterminator video camera.
  • Orion ED100 100mm Apochromatic Refractor Telescope.
  • Coronado Solarmax 90mm Double Stack dedicated Solar Telescope.

The observatory is staffed by qualified astronomers and is regularly open to park visitors during published afternoons, evenings, and special events, weather permitting.  When the weather does not permit telescope viewing, EEO provides programs via a large screen television with planetarium software, videos and comprehensive interactive Q/A sessions.

OBSERVATORY PROGRAMS

Twilight Program ~ starts at dusk

Join us for an educational Twilight Program that takes place before our Dark Sky Program. There is no telescope viewing during the Twilight Program. This program consists of educational video and images of the night sky, as well as special target discussions on what you will see at the Dark Sky Program.

Dark Sky Program ~ starts an hour and a half after the start of the Twilight Program

Join us for our Dark Sky Program that takes place after our Twilight Program.
Escape to the stars with the help of Eagle Eye’s high-tech telescopes and knowledgeable astronomer. Our telescopes offer research quality views of the moon, distant stars, and deep-sky objects, while also offering a vibrant, naked-eye look on the dark, night sky. Enjoy night sky constellation tours and views of celestial objects. Fun for the whole family.

Please enjoy this magnificent celestial experience, be courteous and respectful to those around you, utilize minimal footprint, and help keep our skies clean and dark!

A Message from our astronomer

The cool crisp air of the winter sky can be an opportunity for some of the best viewing of astronomical objects, so bundle up and take a look. There are winter constellations with spectacular views to see.

 

The planet Mars is only a couple of weeks past opposition which means it is still very close to Earth (about 35 million miles) in its orbit and is very bright and large with some detail visible through telescopes.

 

The month of November brings several Meteor Showers which when viewed from dark skies, can be spectacular. The Leonids Meteor shower peaks on the night of Nov. 17th while the Moon is a thin crescent and will set early for most all of the night will be dark for the shower. This shower historically has had epic outbursts. Parent Body: comet 55P/Temple-Tuttle. Also, Meteor shower Alpha-Monocerotids will peak on 11/21/2020.

 

December brings the #Geminids Meteor Shower on the night of Dec 13-14. This is typically the most viewed wintertime meteor shower, with 100-120 events per hour after midnight. Fortunately, the Moon will be nearing new and rises in the morning. Very little interference if any at all.

 

The last half of the month of December from the 18th onward the sky will be dark with no Moon during the convenient evening hours. This makes viewing Deep Sky objects more visible. The great #Andromeda Galaxy (M42) will be high in the sky along with the #Pinwheel Galaxy (M33) and many more faint very distant galaxies are visible.

 

On the evening of December 21, 2020, there will be a special conjunction of Jupiter and Saturn. A conjunction is when, as viewed from Earth, two objects appear very close to each other. During twilight, just after Sunset, these two planets will be as close to each other as they ever get. (Only 0.06 degrees) Look low in the west to see this rare conjunction.

 

There are also Nebula visible through our telescopes. The Ring Nebula (M57) and the Dumbbell Nebula (M27). Also, the great #Orion Nebula (M42) is a spectacular object to see during late evening.

The open star cluster #Pleiades (M45) is prominent high in the eastern sky which we will point out to you with a guided Laser tour of the Winter Constellations.

 

You can most enjoy the view while dressed warmly and comfortably as our observatory is open air at ambient temperatures.

 

Thanks and keep looking up.

 

Astronomer,

Jim Sheets


NEXT SOLAR ECLIPSE

April 8, 2024 is the next solar eclipse! We are very lucky in that Lake Buchanan falls within the central path of this eclipse. Because we are in this central path, this means we will be able to see the full solar eclipse from Canyon of the Eagles! How exciting is that?! We will start taking reservations for this spectacular event January 1, 2023.Stay tuned!


SCHEDULE A PRIVATE STAR PARTY

Schedule a private star-viewing for your group it will be educational and a great way to end your day.  Complete the form to receive pricing for your group and to get things started.